Reflux

Acid Reflux presents itself with a variety of symptoms. Our goal is to provide you options that improve your quality of life.





What is the cause of my heartburn?

Your heartburn may be a result of GERD, gastroesophageal reflux disease, a condition of frequent episodes of stomach acid regurgitating into the esophagus.


What is GERD?

GERD stands for gastroesophageal reflux disease, a condition of frequent episodes of stomach acid regurgitating into the esophagus. Heartburn is a classic symptom but there are many others including hoarseness, chronic cough, and difficulty swallowing.


Is GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease) common?

GERD is very common in the United States with some estimates as high as 30%. Nearly two thirds of Americans experience some form of reflux occasionally.


What causes GERD?

GERD is a complex process but is ultimately a disorder of a failing gastroesophageal junction. The tissue of the gastroesophageal junction becomes stretched and thinned until it is no longer able to hold back the pressure created by the muscular stomach.


What is GERD?

GERD stands for gastroesophageal reflux disease, a condition of frequent episodes of stomach acid regurgitating into the esophagus. Heartburn is a classic symptom but there are many others including hoarseness, chronic cough, and difficulty swallowing.


What are the risk factors for GERD?

The biggest risk factor is likely obesity. Age, smoking, and diet may also contribute. However, many patients have GERD without any of these risk factors.


What foods can make GERD worse?

Many great foods are known to cause reflux! Tomatoes, onions, garlic, caffeine, citrus, chocolate, peppermint, spices, and alcohol are all common instigators.


What are my options for treatment of GERD?

There are many options available for treatment including lifestyle changes, medications, endoscopic procedures, and laparoscopic robotic operations. Many of these options did not exist even ten years ago, so it is important to discuss them regularly with a specialist.


If my medications for GERD aren’t working well, what else can I do?

Lifestyle changes can help to reduce symptoms in many patients. These include decreasing meal size and eating earlier in the day. Patients also have some success sleeping in a more upright position. However, in many cases, these lifestyle measures aren’t enough even in combination with medications. These patients should at least consider surgical options including endoscopic and/or laparoscopic robotic procedures.


If medications are working to control my GERD, then why consider surgery at all?

Every medication has side effects, including those that control stomach acid. Your physician can discuss these with you in detail during an office visit. Furthermore, a lifetime of anti-GERD medications can be quite expensive. Some insurance companies are resistant to paying for the medication that may be most effective for you.


What are my surgical options for treatment?

We offer the full array of anti-reflux procedures including the transoral incisionless fundoplication, robotic hiatal hernia repair, and a traditional Nissen procedure. We would be happy to discuss all of your options in detail during your office visit.



Surgical Group of North Texas © 2018 All Rights Reserved - By Home Key Studios, LLC.